Sponsored Students

Catherine Katese

Catherine is one of six children living with an unemployed single mother. Her father passed away when she was young, leaving behind two wives and thirteen children. Catherine’s sisters and brothers all went to school as long as possible, but poverty impeded their ability to even afford food, let alone pay their school fees. Despite her passion for learning, Catherine would not have been able to continue her education. However, with a scholarship from MGEF, she is now continuing her studies at Baraka Oontoyie Secondary School.

Emily Seleyian

Emily is a very determined girl. Though she was forced to leave home by her family because of her refusal to undergo FGM, Emily managed to attend school up to Grade 10. However, due to mounting school fees, Emily was told to leave school. Emily returned to school in September 2016 under MGEF's sponsorship and is seeking a sponsor to support her as she continues her education.

Esther Topisia

Esther was born in 1999 and is the oldest of six children. Her family is extremely poor and depends on relatives to survive. Esther was brought to MGEF's attention by a local area chief and now attends Moi Girls Secondary School under an MGEF scholarship.

Felister Naisoi

Felister belongs to a family of 11 children. Her father is the only financial support for the family and struggles to pay for even the most basic necessities. To add further financial strain to the family, Felister’s father is chronically ill and must dedicate a portion of his income to medical expenses. Though Felister is determined to continue her education, Felister’s family’s extreme poverty has frequently left her unable to pay for school fees. Felister is seeking your support to attend secondary school and continue her studies.

Jackline Nkapili

Jackline is the eldest of five children in her family. Her father passed away in 2003, and her mother is ill and unable to care for her children. Jackline and her siblings rely entirely on an uncle in order to survive. Despite her difficult situation at home, Jackline excelled in primary school, serving as "head girl" and scoring an impressive 329 points on her national KCPE exam. Her uncle, who has a family of his own, could not afford to send Jackline to secondary school. He submitted an application for assistance from MGEF, and Jackline was accepted into the program in February 2013.

Linet Piraon

Linet and her four siblings lost their father in 2005 and have since relied completely on their single, unemployed mother. The family’s sole source of income comes from selling livestock, a trade affected by long droughts and dry seasons. Faced with financial instability, Linet sought support from MGEF in early 2016 in order to attend secondary school.

Lornah Pilale

Lornah is one of 15 children born to one of her father's three wives. Her mother is uneducated. Lornah's father does not believe in educating girls and married off his eldest daughter at age 16. The family is extremely poor, and the prospect of a dowry of cows, goats, and cash in such a family places Lornah at high risk of an early marriage. Lornah is able to go to school and avoid the fate of her elder sister with a scholarship from MGEF.

Lucy Nenkai

After Lucy completed the 5th grade, her family could no longer afford to pay the cost of her education. Her father suffers from poor health and is unable to help support his wife and their four children. In 2002, Lucy's family moved in with relatives to find food and shelter, and an aunt paid for Lucy to go to school. However, due to a prolonged drought in Kenya, the relatives are no longer able to support both families. A scholarship from MGEF enables Lucy to continue her education.

Mercy Mbaika

Mercy is an exceptional student. Earning 378 marks out of 500 when she sat for the KCPE exam in 2015, Mercy hoped to advance to secondary school. However, both of her parents are unemployed and could not afford to support her education. In 2016, MGEF accepted Mercy as a scholarship recipient. Determined to succeed in school, Mercy dreams of becoming a doctor.

Mercy Tomonik

Mercy belongs to a family of eleven children. Her parents are illiterate and unemployed, having sold all of their cattle to pay for family necessities. Mercy's two older sisters never enrolled in school and were both married off, at 12 and 15 years old. All of Mercy's older brothers have their own families, leaving Mercy and her younger brother to live alone with their elderly parents and a sister. The children rely entirely on money generated from their mother's traditional Maasai "shukas" to eat and live. Awarded an MGEF scholarship in 2013, Mercy is now able to continue her education.

Pascaline Naisiae

Pascaline’s mother separated from her husband over his misuse of alcohol and has since received no support from him for her children. Pascaline’s maternal grandparents and uncle have been providing her family with the most basic necessities and money for school. Though Pascaline’s uncle has been able to protect her from FGM and early marriage by supporting her education through primary school, he may no longer be able to pay her school fees. Pascaline, who dreams of becoming a lawyer, is seeking support to continue her studies in secondary school.

Susan Martine

Susan is one of 15 children born to an unemployed father and mother. Both are illiterate. Only one of Susan's sisters enrolled in school, but she was forced to drop out in Class 8 due to lack of funds. Thus far, two of Susan's other sisters have been married off in early adolescence. The family relies entirely on money that Susan's mother makes from collecting and selling firewood, as her father is ill and cannot work. Without an MGEF scholarship, Susan would not have been able to go on to secondary school, and like her sisters, she would soon have been married off to ease the family poverty. However, MGEF's sponsorship has enabled Susan to avoid this fate and realize her dream of being educated.

Zainab Sempeyo

Zainab’s father suffers from an illness that prevents him from working and forces the family to dedicate a large portion of their income to his medical expenses. Her father’s illness has a profound psychological effect on her mother, who also does not work. Before receiving her MGEF scholarship, Zainab was dependent on the charity of others for school fees through grade four. By grade five, Zainab had no means to continue her education and was on the verge of dropping out of school when MGEF began sponsoring her in 2011. Zainab did well through primary and secondary school. In the autumn of 2019, she was accepted to AMREF International University to study nursing.